Copper (II) Phosphate Formula

Copper phosphide, Cu3P, also copper(I) phosphide, cuprous phosphide, cuprophosphorus and phosphor copper, is a compound of copper and phosphorus, a phosphide of copper. It has the appearance of yellowish-grey very brittle mass of crystalline structure. It does not react with water.In chemistry, a phosphide is a compound containing the P3- ion or its equivalent. Many different phosphides are known, with widely differing structures.[1] Most commonly encountered on the binary phosphides, i.e. those materials consisting only of phosphorus and a less electronegative element. Numerous are polyphosphides, which are solids consisting of anionic chains or clusters of phosphorus. Phosphides are known with the majority of less electronegative elements with the exception of Hg, Pb, Sb, Bi, Te, and Po.[2] Finally, some phosphides are molecular.Copper(II) phosphate (not to be confused with copper(I) phosphate) in an inorganic compound consisting of copper cations and the phosphate anions; with the chemical formula Cu3(PO4)2. It may also be regarded as the cupric salt of phosphoric acid.

Chemical Name

Copper (II) Phosphate

Other Name

:

Tricopper Diphosphate, Tricopper Bis(Orthophosphate)

Chemical Formula

:

Cu3(PO4)2

State

:

Solid

Category

:

Organic

Appearance

:

Light Bluish-green Powder (anhydrous) Blue Or Olive Crystals (trihydrate)

Molar Mass / Molecular Weight

:

380.581 g/mol

Molar Density

:

3.60 G/cm3 (anhydrous) 2.286 G/cm3 (pentahydrate)

Boiling Point

:

1,800 °C (3,270 °F; 2,070 K)

Melting Point

:

900 °C (1,650 °F; 1,170 K)

Copper phosphide, Cu3P, also copper(I) phosphide, cuprous phosphide, cuprophosphorus and phosphor copper, is a compound of copper and phosphorus, a phosphide of copper. It has the appearance of yellowish-grey very brittle mass of crystalline structure. It does not react with water.In chemistry, a phosphide is a compound containing the P3- ion or its equivalent. Many different phosphides are known, with widely differing structures.[1] Most commonly encountered on the binary phosphides, i.e. those materials consisting only of phosphorus and a less electronegative element. Numerous are polyphosphides, which are solids consisting of anionic chains or clusters of phosphorus. Phosphides are known with the majority of less electronegative elements with the exception of Hg, Pb, Sb, Bi, Te, and Po.[2] Finally, some phosphides are molecular.Copper(II) phosphate (not to be confused with copper(I) phosphate) in an inorganic compound consisting of copper cations and the phosphate anions; with the chemical formula Cu3(PO4)2. It may also be regarded as the cupric salt of phosphoric acid.


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